Journal of Oil Palm Research Vol. 21  2009 June p.  613-620
DOI:

Solid-state characteristics of microcrystalline cellulos from oil palm empty fruit bunch fibre

Author(s): ROSNAH Mat Soom* ; ASTIMAR Abd Aziz* ; WAN HASAMUDIN Wan Hassan* ; AB GAPOR Md Top*

Oil palm empty fruit bunches (EFB) are one of the by-products gen­er­ated from palm oil mills. They con­sist mainly of lig­no­cel­lu­losic com­pounds, namely cel­lu­lose, hemi­cel­lu­lose and lignin. Cel­lu­lose, in par­tic­u­lar, con­sti­tutes about 37% (dry weight) of the EFB, and is a com­pound with high value and can be exploited for the ben­e­fit of the palm oil indus­try.
In this study, an attempt to pre­pare micro­crys­talline cel­lu­lose (MCC) from the iso­lated EFB-cellulose was car­ried out. The MCC was pre­pared by con­trolled acid hydrol­y­sis of the iso­lated a-cellulose which attacked the amor­phous region, and was fol­lowed by the back neu­tral­iza­tion process with alkali. The struc­tural prop­er­ties of the cel­lu­lose and MCC were stud­ied by Fourier Trans­formed Infra-red Spec­trom­e­try (FTIR) and X-ray dif­frac­tion meth­ods. The FTIR spec­trum of MCC from EFB was iden­ti­cal to that of the com­mer­cial MCC as well as the cel­lu­lose which showed com­pa­ra­ble pres­ence of C-O-C, C-C, O-H, and C-H bands. How­ever, a broad peak at 3329 cm–1 was observed from the EFB-cellulose due to absorp­tion vibra­tion of the hydroxyl groups. The X-ray dif­frac­tion pat­tern revealed a low degree of order for EFB-cellulose and a rel­a­tively ordered struc­ture for EFB-MCC. Two peaks of dif­frac­tion angles rang­ing between 19º and 23º were observed in the EFB-MCC, indi­cat­ing the pres­ence of a small per­cent­age of cel­lu­lose II. The com­mer­cial MCC had a highly ordered struc­ture com­pared to EFB-MCC as indi­cated by the pres­ence of a sin­gle peak at 22.5º.

Keywords: , , ,

Author Information
* Malaysian Palm Oil Board, P. O. Box 10620, 50720 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.
E-mail: astimar@mpob.gov.my


Cited By

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Source: Scopus
Last updated: 24 February 2017

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