Journal of Oil Palm Research Vol. 12 No. 2  2000 Dec p.  29-37
DOI:

Nutrient cycling in an oil palm plantation: the effects of residue management practices during replanting on dry matter and nutrient uptake of young palms

Author(s): KHALID Haron* ; ZIN ZAWAWI Zakaria* ; ANDERSON, J.M**

Oil palm residues during replanting contributed significant amount of nutrients that can be recycled in the plantation. The management of oil palm residues affects the release of nutrients and hence their uptake and the growth of young palms. Dry matter and nutrient uptake of young palms and ground cover were estimated. Planting young palms directly onto the residue pile is the most effective method of biomass management during replanting as it provides better synchronization between nutrient release and plant uptake.

The young palms only utilized about 10% – 20% of the total nutrient uptake that is mostly found in the fronds. The young palms planted onto the residue pile is the most effective method of biomass management during replanting as it provides better synchronization between nutrient release and plant uptake.

The young palms only utilized about 10%-20% of the total nutrient uptake that is mostly found in the fronds. The young palms planted onto the residue pile without inorganic fertilizer inputs immobilized about 30 kg N ha-1, 3 kg P ha-1, 43 kg K ha-‘, 6 Kg Ca ha-1 and 4 kg Mg ha-1, over the 18-month period of assessment. The results obtained showed that the chipped and shredded (C / S) treatment was the most efficient. More than 80% of the nutrients were consumed by the ground cover which comprised legumes and weeds. The ground cover immobilized about 254 kg N ha-1, 19 kg P ha-1, 181 kg K ha-‘, 56 kg Ca ha-1 and 28 kg P ha-1 over 18 months and became a transient pool that would recycle its nutrients at a later stage in the plantation life.

Keywords: , , , , , ,

Author Information
*Malaysian Palm Oil Board, P.O. Box 10620, 50720 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

** Department of Biological Sciences, University of Exeter, U.K.


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