Journal of Oil Palm Research Vol. 28  September 2016 p.  247-255
DOI: https://doi.org/10.21894/jopr.2016.2803.02

COMPARISON OF THE EFFECTIVENESS OF BASTA, BIALAPHOS AND GLUFOSINATE AMMONIUM FOR SELECTING TRANSFORMED OIL PALM TISSUES

Author(s): A RAHMAN NURFAHISZA*; MD AMAN RAFIQAH*; GHULAM KADIR AHMAD PARVEEZ* and OMAR ABDUL RASID*

One of the important requirements for producing transgenic plants is the ability to isolate true transformed cells and regenerate into complete plants without chimera and escapes. Therefore, an efficient selection process is essential. In this study, three different selection agents, namely Basta, bialaphos and glufosinate ammonium were evaluated on embryogenic calli and embryoids, for their effectiveness on selecting transformed oil palm tissues. Untransformed tissues were used in this study as the minimal concentrations which inhibit the growth of the tissues would be the optimum concentrations for selecting the transformed cells. Based on this study, the growth of embryogenic calli was shown to be fully inhibited at 10 mg litre-1 of Basta. Meanwhile, only 3 mg litre-1 of bialaphos and glufosinate ammonium are needed to inhibit the embryogenic calli. For oil palm embryoid cultures, the minimal concentration for Basta was determined at 20 mg litre-1 as compared to 5 mg litre-1 for bialaphos and glufosinate ammonium. This result indicated that a higher concentration of Basta is needed to completely inhibit the growth of oil palm tissues as compared to bialaphos and glufosinate ammonium. Furthermore, these observations revealed that embryogenic calli are more sensitive to the three selection agents as compared to embryoids. The information gained from this study will be used as a guideline to increase the efficiency for selecting transformed oil palm cells and producing transgenic oil palm.

Keywords: , , , ,

Author Information
* Malaysian Palm Oil Board, 6 Persiaran Institusi, Bandar Baru Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor, Malaysia.
E-mail: parveez@mpob.gov.my


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